when you translate a log file, i think there is a date and time attached to each sql statement. Ex: --INSERT-1073-0367432565. i believe 1073 is a connection number, and 0367432565 is the date and time. is there a way to translate the date and time info into something more useful?

asked 29 Apr '13, 11:22

Tom%20Mangano's gravatar image

Tom Mangano
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accept rate: 6%

edited 29 Apr '13, 13:03

Mark%20Culp's gravatar image

Mark Culp
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You are correct, the '1073' in '--INSERT-1073-0367432565' refers to the unique number given to the connection that originally executed the operation. The '0367432565' refers to the logical log offset within transaction log and unfortunately there is no method (that I know of) that can be used to definitively convert this number into a date and time.

You could narrow down the time that the operation occurred by looking at other operations (e.g. CONNECT and CHECKPOINT operations, and to some degree other transaction operations that include timestamps that were created with CURRENT TIMESTAMP) that come before and after the operation.

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answered 29 Apr '13, 11:32

Mark%20Culp's gravatar image

Mark Culp
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accept rate: 40%

edited 29 Apr '13, 11:36

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question asked: 29 Apr '13, 11:22

question was seen: 782 times

last updated: 29 Apr '13, 13:03